What Does the Catholic Church Say About Tattoos?



June 5, 2014

From small ankle tattoos to tattooed sleeves, I am seeing tattoos on men and women more and more frequently. In fact, an estimated 40 million Americans have at least one tattoo, and tattoo parlors are one of the fastest growing businesses in the U.S.

With the increased popularity of tattoos comes the question of their morality. After all, a tattoo is a permanent marking of the body—a serious issue to be sure. So are they wrong? Should a good Catholic get one?

I am well aware that the answers to this question vary widely. Some feel strongly that marking your body is always immoral. Others see tattoos as a perfectly legitimate form of self expression. But personal feelings aside, is there an objective answer? Let’s take a look.

Right or Wrong?

The primary argument opponents of tattoos cite is the Levitical law prohibiting them. Leviticus 19:28 says, “Do not lacerate your bodies for the dead, and do not tattoo yourselves. I am the LORD.”

While this sounds like a fairly clear condemnation of tattoos, we have to keep in mind the context of the Old Testament law. It’s fairly obvious to me that the prohibition against tattoos was directly related to pagan worship, just as the prohibition against graven images was.

But regardless of the original intent, it is Catholic teaching that the old covenant ceremonial law no longer applies to us as new covenant faithful, and to say otherwise is contrary to the whole message of the New Testament. For example, immediately preceding and following that verse are prohibitions against trimming one’s beard and eating red meat. Now, I recently ate a medium rare steak, and I’m pretty confident I didn’t sin. I also regularly trim my beard, which also isn’t a sin (though some might think it is!).

There are literally hundreds of old covenant laws that no longer apply to us as Christians. We can’t cherry pick laws from the Old Testament to use as ammunition for our personal preferences. Either we follow them all, or we don’t—and St. Paul makes it perfectly clear that the ceremonial law is no longer binding.

I’ll cut to the chase: There is nothing immoral about tattoos. Mother Church has never condemned them, and neither can I. It is one of those areas where a Catholic must follow his or her conscience.

Personally, I wouldn’t get a tattoo. I don’t find them attractive, and they are far too permanent for my taste. That said, those of us who dislike tattoos should be careful never to judge a brother or sister in Christ who chooses to get one.

Danger, Will Robinson, Danger

While tattoos may not be immoral, I strongly believe they need to be approached with an extra degree of caution and prudence due to their permanence. Yes, they can sometimes be removed, but this is a painful and expensive process. Accordingly, you should never get one lightly or flippantly, nor should you cover your body in things that are displeasing to God (a naked or scantily clad lady on your arm is a not acceptable).

Here are two things you should keep in mind if you are considering a tattoo.

1. Type – One of the most important decisions regarding tattoos is what kind you choose to get. This may seem rather obvious, but I know far too many individuals who have gotten a tattoo they later regretted. Whether it’s the name of an ex-girlfriend, an obscene image, or a curse word, there are some things you don’t want marking your body forever. And while tattoos themselves may be amoral, your choice of tattoo can be indeed be immoral depending on what it is.

If you decide to get a tattoo, think of it as putting on a piece of clothing that you will be wearing forever. If you can’t imagine yourself wearing it when you’re 50 or 70 years old, you shouldn’t get it. Take extra time to examine your motives. Is this a rash decision motivated by peer pressure or an attempt to be cool? Or is something deeply meaningful to you?

I have seen beautiful tattoos of Our Lady of Guadalupe or the Sacred Heart that were chosen out of devotion and love. But I have also seen “Murder” tattooed on someone’s neck and Betty Boop on someone’s arm. Some choices are clearly better than others, and some are indeed immoral.

When choosing a tattoo, the best rule is that of St. Paul: Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable.

2. Degree – Another consideration that warrants prudence is the amount and placement of tattoos. Your face, neck, or other highly visible areas are probably not wise places to mark your body. In other words, don’t express your grief by getting tattoo tears!

As with anything, moderation is also important. While a tattoo is not wrong, it is excessive and probably immoral to cover your entire body in ink. It is certainly not in accord with the virtue of temperance and the scriptural command to exercise “moderation in all things.” I admit it is difficult to choose a point when tattoos become excessive, but it is always best to exercise a high degree of caution.

Conclusion

Opinions are strong on both sides of this issue, and I’m sure there will be some readers who disagree with my assessment. Still, love them or hate them, I can find nothing that prohibits a Catholic from getting a tattoo, and we must be careful not to make this a moral issue when there is no clear magisterial teaching on it. Still, as with anything in the Christian life, the virtues of temperance, charity, and prudence apply.

FAQs

What does the Church Teach about Tattoos?

What does the Church Teach about Tattoos? The reason being that, in principle, the Church does not oppose tattoos. Ceremonial Law vs. Moral Law Sometimes people point to the passage in Leviticus that says, ”Do not . . . put tattoo marks on yourselves. I am the Lord” (19:28). But this verse is not binding upon Christians for the same reason that the verse “nor shall there come upon you a garment of cloth made of two kinds of stuff” (Lev. 19:19) is not binding upon Christians. Namely, it is a part of the ceremonial law that was binding upon the Jewish people but not binding upon Christians (except for when it coincides with the moral law). The author of Hebrews writes: Now if perfection had been attainable through the Levit’ical priesthood (for under it the people received the law), what further need would there have been for another priest to arise after the order of Melchiz’edek, rather than one named after the order of Aaron? For when there is a change in the priesthood, there is necessarily a change in the law as well (11-12). Similarly, St. Irenaeus of Lyon wrote, “The laws of bondage, however, were one by one promulgated to the people by Moses, suited for their instruction or for their punishment, as Moses himself declared: ‘And the Lord commanded me at that time to teach you statutes and judgments’ (Deut. 4:14). These things, therefore, which were given for bondage, and for a sign to them, He cancelled by the new covenant of liberty (Against Heresies IV.16.5). To Tattoo or Not to Tattoo So is the prohibition against tattoos in Leviticus a part of the moral law? My colleague, Jimmy Akin writes says no: There is no reason why one cannot color one’s skin, which is what tattooing amounts to. One can apply color to one’s skin by make-up (as is common among women), magic markers (as is common among children), press-on tattoos (as are common in Crackerjack boxes), or with real tattoos. The mere fact that the ink goes into the skin in the latter case does not create a fundamental moral difference. But if you do decide to get a tattoo, consider the following: 1. The images should not be immoral, such as sexually explicit, Satanic, or in anyway opposed to the truths and teachings of Christianity. 2. Be prudent. While “Mom” is probably a safe bet, tattooing your current girlfriend’s name on your arm probably isn’t. 3. Consider the arguments against tattooing (there’s bound to be a good website out there devoted to that). Just because the Church doesn’t prohibit getting one doesn’t mean that you should. Consider the following question: Would you put a bumper sticker on a ferrai? The advice I gave to my sister when she was considering a tattoo was to give it several months. If you still feel strongly about the tattoo you had in mind after that time, then maybe get it. If, during that time, you change your mind about the type of tattoo you wanted, or where it should be located, perhaps wait another several months before getting it.

Complete Post

A Marked Man: Should Catholics Get Tattoos?

A Marked Man: Should Catholics Get Tattoos? – The Catholic Gentleman June 5, 2014 From small ankle tattoos to tattooed sleeves, I am seeing tattoos on men and women more and more frequently. In fact, an estimated 40 million Americans have at least one tattoo, and tattoo parlors are one of the fastest growing businesses in the U.S. With the increased popularity of tattoos comes the question of their morality. After all, a tattoo is a permanent marking of the body—a serious issue to be sure. So are they wrong? Should a good Catholic get one? I am well aware that the answers to this question vary widely. Some feel strongly that marking your body is always immoral. Others see tattoos as a perfectly legitimate form of self expression. But personal feelings aside, is there an objective answer? Let’s take a look. Right or Wrong? The primary argument opponents of tattoos cite is the Levitical law prohibiting them. Leviticus 19:28 says, “Do not lacerate your bodies for the dead, and do not tattoo yourselves. I am the LORD.” While this sounds like a fairly clear condemnation of tattoos, we have to keep in mind the context of the Old Testament law. It’s fairly obvious to me that the prohibition against tattoos was directly related to pagan worship, just as the prohibition against graven images was. But regardless of the original intent, it is Catholic teaching that the old covenant ceremonial law no longer applies to us as new covenant faithful, and to say otherwise is contrary to the whole message of the New Testament. For example, immediately preceding and following that verse are prohibitions against trimming one’s beard and eating red meat. Now, I recently ate a medium rare steak, and I’m pretty confident I didn’t sin. I also regularly trim my beard, which also isn’t a sin (though some might think it is!). There are literally hundreds of old covenant laws that no longer apply to us as Christians. We can’t cherry pick laws from the Old Testament to use as ammunition for our personal preferences. Either we follow them all, or we don’t—and St. Paul makes it perfectly clear that the ceremonial law is no longer binding. I’ll cut to the chase: There is nothing immoral about tattoos. Mother Church has never condemned them, and neither can I. It is one of those areas where a Catholic must follow his or her conscience. Personally, I wouldn’t get a tattoo. I don’t find them attractive, and they are far too permanent for my taste. That said, those of us who dislike tattoos should be careful never to judge a brother or sister in Christ who chooses to get one. Danger, Will Robinson, Danger While tattoos may not be immoral, I strongly believe they need to be approached with an extra degree of caution and prudence due to their permanence. Yes, they can sometimes be removed, but this is a painful and expensive process. Accordingly, you should never get one lightly or flippantly, nor should you cover your body in things that are displeasing to God (a naked or scantily clad lady on your arm is a not acceptable). Here are two things you should keep in mind if you are considering a tattoo. 1. Type – One of the most important decisions regarding tattoos is what kind you choose to get. This may seem rather obvious, but I know far too many individuals who have gotten a tattoo they later regretted. Whether it’s the name of an ex-girlfriend, an obscene image, or a curse word, there are some things you don’t want marking your body forever. And while tattoos themselves may be amoral, your choice of tattoo can be indeed be immoral depending on what it is. If you decide to…

Get Started

Is It Ok for Catholics to Get a Tattoo? 5 Things to Consider

Is It Ok For Catholics To Get A Tattoo? 5 Things To Consider In today’s video, Fr. Mike Schmitz gives us some things to consider before getting a tattoo. If we do choose to place permanent marks on our bodies, we need to make sure the marks portray values we’ll always identify with and live up to, because tattoos do inevitably say something about who we are. When considering getting a tattoo, here are some important considerations: 1. Many quote Leviticus 19 where it says not to get tattoos. But if understood in its context, the prohibition was dealing with cultural or religious reasons (tattoos, for example, that expressed devotion to a false god) more than the act of getting a tattoo itself. 2. Lewd or crude tattoos are evidently not good. 3. Where you get them is important. The “where” is directly related to what you are trying to say (especially about your sexuality) and can be inappropriate. 4. An excessive number of tattoos isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it does raise the question: “What are you saying when you mark up your body so much?” What are you trying to say with these tattoos? 5. Before you get a tattoo, ask yourself the question: 10 years ago, what type of tattoo would you get? 10 years later, would you still want that tattoo on your body?

Complete Post

What Does the Catholic Church Say About Tattoos?

What Does the Catholic Church Say About Tattoos? Written By Dan Hunter on October 1, 2021Last Updated: February 18, 2022 Tattoos are increasingly fashionable and are a popular way to show your personality as a piece of body art. There are lots of different styles of tattoos and parts of your body where these can be inked.  While people think about the placement and design of the tattoo, there are also other things to consider before getting a tattoo. There are religious and cultural concerns to think about, especially if you’re a religious person or if your family is religious. One of the questions you may ask is what does the Catholic church say about tattoos? This is a big question to ask and there are lots of different thoughts about it. We’ll let you know what the Catholic church thinks about tattoos and if these are forbidden or not. Are Tattoos Forbidden by the Catholic Church? If you ask Catholics about tattoo’s most of them would say that they’re not forbidden. However, others will have a different perception. There is no law against tattoos but many Catholics see them as a sinful act that God wouldn’t approve of. Some people see tattoos as a bad thing, so even though it’s not forbidden they will use religion as a way to put you off having a tattoo.  When thinking of getting a tattoo as a Catholic, you should make sure that the tattoo shows values that you’ll always identify with and live up to. There should be nothing immoral, Satanic, or opposed to the teachings of Christianity. What Does the Catholic Church Say About Tattoos? All religions have different views on tattoos and whether you should have them or not. Tattoos are not forbidden in the Catholic church, however, your tattoos should not go against the teachings of the Catholic church.  The Catholic church takes all of its teachings from the bible and the Old Testament does talk about tattoos, and how they are sinful. “Do not lacerate your bodies for the dead, and do not tattoo yourselves. I am the Lord” (Leviticus 19:28). However, the New Testament doesn’t mention tattoos, and this is why most Catholics believe that it’s ok to get a tattoo. The Bible says that your body is the temple of God and that it’s his own creation, meaning that it shouldn’t be changed. Many Catholics consider this when getting a tattoo and show honor to their religion. Can a Catholic Priest Get a Tattoo? There’s no rule or law that says that a Catholic priest is forbidden from getting a tattoo. However, it’s very rare to ever see a Catholic priest that has a tattoo. Catholics look up to the priests of their church and follow their teachings so this is probably one of the reasons why they don’t have tattoos.  Tattooing wasn’t a common thing to do years ago but is now increasingly popular. Maybe as younger priests come along, the views of tattoos may change a little. As the culture changes, the Catholic church may become more open-minded regarding tattoos. What Does the Pope Think About Tattoos? The Pope is surprisingly positive when talking about tattoos in recent conferences. When he was asked which parts of the modern culture he thought were good and bad, he responded, “don’t be afraid of tattoos.” He has also talked about how tattoos are a way of engaging in delightful conversations and are a sign of belonging. It’s important to keep the root of Christianity and its teachings at the forefront, but there is also room for the times to change. The younger generation are still religious, however, they are looking for a more modern approach to communicate their values. What’s the Right Way To Get a Tattoo as a Catholic? Tattoos are a big commitment for everyone that’s looking to get one and this is even more…

Hear their story

Are tattoos accepted in the Catholic Church?

Are tattoos accepted in the Catholic Church? – Embulbul Catholic Parish No straightforward answer to this question. However, at a meeting with young people before the Synod of Catholic bishops, Pope Francis said; “don’t be afraid of tattoos“. … A tattoo can become a talking point and a way for the priest to find out more about an individual… (Mar 22, 2018). The Church doesn’t have any strict teaching about tattoos because in most cases they are culturally based and according to the Church cultures should be respected. Unless something is objectively immoral, or we have immoral motives for doing it, Catholics are free to do as they wish. Due to diversity of culture, some texts in the Bible forbid tattoos while others consider tattoos as ornament. I think the best thing I can do in this bulletin is to give some insights from Scripture and Catholic teaching to help one come to a good decision in the conscience before or after making tattoos. In the O.T, God commanded; “… do not tattoo yourselves” (Lev. 19:28). Also, “… your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit …” (I Cor. 6:19). The Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC) says; “unless performed for strictly therapeutic medical reasons, directly intended…, mutilations … performed on innocent persons are against the moral law” (CCC. 2297). While the Church does not have a specific teaching on tattoos, it definitively teaches that we are obligated to honor our bodies and to regard them as good. When we consider things like tattoos or piercings, we should be asking, am I honoring my body as a God-given good? (Gaudium et Spes. 14:1). I don’t think it means that tattoos are “intrinsically evil.” It would be an error to say that every tattoo in every circumstance is always wrong. Some cultures use them for identity and decoration. For instance, having a mark on the forehead to indicate ones’ marital status for many Asian cultures. In Ethiopia, Christians have the custom of tattooing a cross on their forehead and the hand to express their Christian faith. That is why the Bible says; “I adorned you with jewelry, putting bracelets on your arms, a necklace about your neck, a ring in your nose, earrings in your ears, and a beautiful crown on your head” (Ez 16:11–12). God here is speaking to Jerusalem in the language of a groom addressing his bride. This doesn’t mean that everyone should go out and pierce their nose, but it does indicate that these sorts of decorative piercings are not objectively immoral, if God is using them as a means of describing how beautiful he has made his bride, Jerusalem. The context and culture, I believe are important aspects to look at when discussing the morality of tattoos. One key point is that in many of these cultural examples, tattoos are not only socially accepted; they are also often socially expected and accepted. So when you go for tattoos ask whether it is culturally expected and accepted. In any case if your body was made by God and is beautiful just as it is, why add additional permanent marking that may lead to skin complications like cancer? The world is fighting against mutilation because of the scars it leaves behind. Sometimes an adolescent enjoys having a tattoo, but many as they grow old they regret because the same tattoo doesn’t carry the same meaning as it does with cultures. Another aspect to consider is tattoos carry meaning. If you were to decide to get a tattoo, is it diabolic images, carrying ugly images, shocking images, images pertaining to horoscopes, and simply put, any image contrary to the Christian faith. Any image like this would surely fall into the category of sin. Lastly, are you under peer pressure or gangs? Make sure your choice comes from the conscience. Fr. Thaddeus Mokaya, SMA Read more articles

Complete Post

Tattoos are visible signs of lived faith – U.S. Catholic

Tattoos are visible signs of lived faith A search of #catholictattoo on Instagram yields thousands of results. Our Lady of Sorrows cries juicy tears on biceps; rosaries snake down forearms and wrists; sacred hearts in full color burn on chests; and Virgin Marys stomp snakes from reddened, puffy, freshly inked skin. #religioustattoos yields tens of thousands more images, many of them Catholic. Catholic imagery seems increasingly mobile and personalized, made newly portable by being inked into the skin. In 2018 at a meeting with young Catholics before the Synod of Bishops on Young People, a Ukrainian seminarian asked Pope Francis about tattoos and how to discern the “good” parts of modern culture. “Don’t be afraid of tattoos,” Pope Francis instructed, because they can be starting points for priests to connect with the young. He continued on to say that “tattoos signify membership in a community” and can open up conversations about belonging. While Pope Francis encourages new openness toward contemporary body modifications, there is, in fact, a much longer history to Catholic tattoos. For centuries, Catholics have rendered their religious journeys, their devotions, and their communal identities permanent in flesh. Today’s burgeoning tattoo culture reflects the history of Catholic votives, sacramentals, and pilgrimages and the many physical ways Catholics have entered into relationships with sacred places, the saints, and one another. Looking at the rich tradition of Catholic sacramentals, objects, and gestures excites “pious dispositions,” according to the Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation. In her book Material Christianity (Yale University Press), Colleen McDannell writes that they “serve as a doorway between the sacred and secular worlds”: Both these descriptions offer us insight into tattoos. These objects, no matter how precious or mundane in substance, invite users and wearers into relationships beyond the medium in which they are made. While the church has traditionally defined sacramentals as objects that have been officially blessed and authorized, Catholics have understood many things—regardless of their official status—to be holy. For Catholics, there is rich potential for the sacred throughout the material world and in daily life. Little objects made of gold, plastic, wood, and wool, when worn close to the skin or on the body, have helped Catholics inhabit and feel their religious identities.Advertisement Carrying your grandmother’s rosary, keeping your keys together with an Our Lady of Guadalupe keychain, tucking a prayer card into your wallet, wearing a scapular under your shirt, or keeping a little saint on your dashboard are all examples of objects and actions that inspire feelings of comfort, assurance, and protection. These physical reminders are channels of divine and human love. Increasingly, tattoos stand in for these more traditional Catholic objects and practices as lifelong and durable signs of devotion. However, tattoos also have a much longer Catholic history. Historically, the Franciscans were quite the promoters of tattoos in their role as caretakers of the Holy Land. As early as the 16th century, Holy Land pilgrims included getting tattooed on their itineraries. Along with visiting the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and walking on the Via Dolorosa, pilgrims made time to have their skin engraved. According to historian Katherine Dauge-Roth, Franciscans “invited tattoo artists into their monasteries to perform their services or allowed them to set up shop on the grounds of shrines maintained by the order.” Much like today’s flash tattoos (readily available, predrawn designs), artisans in the Holy Land offered a catalogue of “pilgrim flash,” engraved woodblocks that offered iconography such as the Jerusalem cross or…

Yes! I want More

“Ask a Priest: Is Getting a Tattoo Against Catholic Beliefs …

“Ask a Priest: Is Getting a Tattoo Against Catholic Beliefs?” – RC Spirituality Q: I have been considering getting a tattoo for some time now but want to make sure that it’s not against Catholic beliefs. It would be a medium-size tattoo with a Bible verse and cross. -M.W. Answered by Fr. Edward McIlmail, LC A: There are no hard-and-fast Church rules against tattoos. There are, however, a few points you might want to consider. The Catechism in No. 2288 notes, “Life and physical health are precious gifts entrusted to us by God. We must take reasonable care of them, taking into account the needs of others and the common good.” Tattoos carry a remote risk of infection, so you might want to consider whether it is worth the danger. Another consideration is from Scripture: “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God, and that you are not your own?” (1 Corinthians 6:19). Among God’s gifts to us are our bodies, and we are meant to glorify the Lord through our bodies. We can do this in the words we speak, in the way we dress, and the manner in which we groom ourselves. You might ask yourself whether a tattoo will give glory to the Almighty. As a woman you have a natural beauty that is meant to reflect the glory of God in a special way. Will a tattoo mar that beauty? Also, what if you change your mind in six months and decide you don’t like the tattoo anymore? Think about how often college students like to change the posters on their walls: An image that speaks to us in one season of our lives may not speak to us in the same way in another season of our lives. Posters are easy to change and take into account that reality. But tattoos aren’t easy to remove; they are meant to be permanent. Would it be better, perhaps, to take the Bible verse you have in mind and make a special effort to live the verse in your day-to-day life? That is a way to really give glory to God. As for the cross, wearing a crucifix might suffice to let others know about your Christian faith. I hope some of this helps. I hope that you choose wisely. God bless.

Show Me More

Tattoos and Catholic Morality

Tattoos and Catholic MoralityDIFFICULT MORAL QUESTIONS: How the craze for tattoos seems to be ‘sinptomatic’ in the post-Christian West. Q. I’m a priest in Mexico. I get a lot of questions about the morality of tattoos. Many young people want to get them, and so ask me if permanent skin decorations are a sin. Many devout adults in Mexico believe they are. I believe that openly proclaiming that tattoos are okay could be problematic. Any thoughts? —Rev. José Luis A. I do not think getting a tattoo is sinful, or at least not necessarily so. By this I mean that the act of deliberately imprinting an image or message on oneself, whether permanent or temporary, is not necessarily a violation of any intrinsic human good, permanent command of God (including Leviticus 19:28, the permanent validity of which is disputed by some Jews and Protestants) or teaching of the Catholic Church. Does this mean that it is a matter of moral indifference? No, I do not think this either. If I may coin a word: Although they are not necessarily sinful, I think in the post-Christian West the craze for tattoos is “sinptomatic” — i.e., a cultural symptom of widespread sinning. Our sinfulness causes us to see things wrongly and value things incorrectly, especially things of ultimate importance. St. Paul says those who forget God and give themselves over to sinning grow “futile in their thinking” and their “minds become darkened” (Romans 2). Vast numbers of people in the West in the last 60 years have given themselves over to terrible misuse of the body, especially (but not only) through various forms of sexual misconduct. This has caused a darkening of our understanding and valuation of the human body. We have come to see and treat our bodies “dualistically.” This means we think of our bodies not as ourselves, not as persons, but somehow as our possessions, as things we use to make us happy: “I can do with my body anything I want!” We say this the way we might say this is my house, or my car or my goldfish. If our house no longer suits, we renovate it. If our car no longer pleases, we buy a new one. If caring for our goldfish becomes a nuisance, we destroy it. Seeing our bodies as things rather than persons, as instruments at the service of our conscious selves, is part of a mentality that accompanies some of the gravest sins of our age: bodies without consciousness (e.g., embryos, fetuses, comatose individuals) are not true persons, so we can kill them; our bodies are there for us to use however we want (promiscuity, prostitution, pornography); my body tells me nothing essential about my true self, therefore if I feel consciously attracted to a member of the same sex, I am “gay” and I act out sexually; if I feel I am a woman in a man’s body, I am a woman, despite the clear datum of the body. Body-self dualism can be very destructive. And inasmuch as the tattoo craze is connected to it, I think tattoos can be morally and spiritually unhealthy. You might reply saying that altering our hair color or having cosmetic surgery is not fundamentally different from getting a tattoo: All are efforts to alter the appearance of our bodies. Although I think there may be morally relevant differences, you might be correct. But let’s leave that conversation aside for now. My point is neither to say that every person who gets a tattoo is guilty of body-self dualism, nor to say that every person who gets a new hairdo is not. It is to point out a destructive frame of mind that is undoubtedly a part of our culture today. And to the extent that people see getting a tattoo as a kind of artistic self-expression, it seems they are considering their bodies like canvases on which to express themselves. If this is the case, they are thinking dualistically. Our bodies are not canvases to write on, or ships we pilot, or dwellings we own. They are visible, external manifestations of our wider persons, which…

Get More Info Here

close